Tag: Pianists

Too many concerts by dilettantes?

In answer to the question of why there were too many concerts in Berlin (the topic of my previous post), some critics blamed the women pianists who only put on concerts in order to get “certified” as having braved Berlin before returning home to become a piano teacher. To test the validity of this theory/assumption, […]

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Again: There are too many concerts!

Who is to blame? The complaint that there were too many concerts in Berlin was familiar even in the 1880s; in the 1890s the problem started being diagnosed. The music critic Oskar Eichberg was convinced that the number of concerts had grown so much because they were being given for advertising purposes: musicians playing in the […]

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Concerts in September and October 1907

There were 172 concerts in the month of October and the last 9 days of September, considerably more than earlier months. As usual, the most of any type were the 41 solo voice concerts; piano had 30 and violin 16. There were 18 of what I have labeled “mixed,” usually a concert of two soloists, […]

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When did virtuosos stop playing their own concertos?

In the nineteenth century, it was common for virtuosos to also compose works for themselves to play. At the beginning of the twentieth century, it was less common, but there are still plenty of impressive examples. Pianist Eugen d’Albert not only composed for himself but also wrote operas and other works in almost every genre. […]

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The “standard” of three concertos on a concert

One feature of concert life in 1907 Berlin was the standard of three concertos for a concert given by a soloist. This would be unthinkable today because of the stamina required for both the performer and the audience, and because the lack of variety would be unappealing. After backtracking concerts by the Berlin Philharmonic to […]

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Concerts in February 1907

Highlights There were 114 concerts this month. 38 were solo vocal, 25 solo piano, 10 chamber and 8 solo violin.  Noteworthy events besides the two concerts by Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler on the same day and the terrible ship wreck that involved the German Opera Company, included again a phenomenal number of historic personalities […]

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What happened to Alice, Susanne, and Tina?

Of the 117 different pianists I’ve counted who gave concerts in Berlin in 1907, there are of course many more obscure names than stars. A large group of them can be accounted for as teachers or students at one of the local Berlin conservatories. Some of the other names are of virtuosos who were famous […]

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