An assessment of Joachim’s importance from 1931

The centennial of Joachim’s birth in 1931 was observed in Berlin and elsewhere with tributes recalling the important part he had played in so many aspects of musical life. Only a few years later the Nazi re-writing of Germany history began, in which Jewish artists and intellectuals were purged from the German culture they helped create.[1]See Amos Elon,The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933 (Metropolitan Books, 2002).
Beatrix Borchard has described the removal of all of the memorials of Joachim in the Hochschule, including the bust by the sculptor Adolf Hillebrand that was installed in 1913 in the foyer of the building on Fasanenstrasse.[2]Beatrix Borchard, Stimme und Geige. Amalie und Joseph Joachim (Böhlau, 2005):15-18. Since then, the full range of Joachim‘s contributions is slowly being recovered and recognized.
Writings from the centennial give us a snapshot of Joachim reception just before he was erased from music history. I’m impressed by the conviction and corroborating detail of Richard Hohenemser’s assessment for Die Musik. My translation below includes annotations in the white boxes.

Richard Hohenemser, “Joseph Joachim,” Die Musik 23 No. 9 (June 1931): 641-4.

“On June 28, the musical world celebrates the hundredth anniversary of Joseph Joachim’s birth. The question arises whether he, who for sixty years not only gave thousands of people moments of the highest felicity and exaltation, but also sanctified many for their entire musical life, still has and should have significance for the present and the future.”[3]“Am 28. Juni begeht die musikalische Welt die hundertste Wiederkehr des Geburtstages Joseph Joachims. Da drängt sich die Frage auf, ob er, der 60 Jahre hindurch nicht nur Tausenden Augenblicke … Continue reading

In the opening paragraph, Joachim is said to have “sanctified” musicians. That’s not a musical or pedagogical term, but a religious procedure. There’s no other way to translate “geheiligt.”

“The effect he has had on the position of certain works in the concert hall is historically fixed and will remain so. It was only through him that the incomparable beauty of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto was revealed to the world, which had previously been performed only occasionally by individual violinists. Today, every true violinist considers it one of his highest tasks to do justice to this concerto.  Joachim was the first who dared to perform Bach’s six sonatas and partitas, which had been newly edited by Ferdinand David, without accompaniment, that is, as they were intended by their creator. With these works, too, he always and everywhere enthralled his listeners, thereby making their study, and with it the study of unaccompanied polyphonic violin playing, virtually obligatory. Beethoven’s last quartets owe to him the position they occupy today in our chamber music performances. The fact that the string quartet is able to occupy such a broad area in contemporary concert life must be attributed to the activities and successes of the quartet player Joachim. No less important than his pioneering work for Bach and Beethoven, and incidentally for Schubert as well, is his advocacy of contemporary compositions, especially the chamber works of Schumann and Brahms and Brahms’s Violin Concerto.”[4]“Geschichtlich feststehend und unbedingt bleibend ist die Wirkung, die er auf die Stellung gewisser Werke im Konzertsaal ausgeübt hat. Erst durch ihn ist der Welt die unvergleichliche … Continue reading

This substantial article leads off with Joachim’s importance for violinists. The Bach unaccompanied Sonatas and Partitas, the Beethoven Violin Concerto, and the late Beethoven Quartets owe their central place in the violin repertoire to him. Hohenemser says he was also important for the “contemporary music” of Schumann and Brahms. That is literally true–they were his contemporaries–but tends to be forgotten because Joachim was consistently berated with showing no interest in new music. Joachim’s main claim to fame today is his connection to Brahms’s Violin Concerto. In this account, however, it is just one of many works associated with his advocacy.

“The long-term impact directly resulting from Joachim’s playing cannot, of course, be determined; but I believe it can hardly be overestimated. His performing was of such convincing power that it had to awaken in every performer the longing at least to play as much like him as possible. Of course, the most individual aspect of the performance, the purely personal, cannot be imitated. Musical reproduction is, or should be, a re-creation, i.e. each time a new experience of the work of art; thus the personality of the performer cannot be eliminated. That is why Joachim never determined his performance down to the smallest detail, but, as his biographer Andreas Moser showed, left room for the inspiration of the moment. He was allowed to do so because he possessed the universal qualities of the artist, i.e. those that every artist should possess, to the highest degree; and that is why his playing had such an instructive effect without ever displaying any pedagogical intention. Above all, he had the necessary will and the unlimited ability to render each work according to its own style. This extended from the basic attitude to all the details.”[5]“Die dauernden Wirkungen, die Joachims Spiel unmittelbar erzeugte, lassen sich natürlicherweise nicht feststellen; aber ich glaube, man kann sie kaum überschätzen. Sein Vortrag war von so … Continue reading

This section claims both that Joachim’s personality came through in his playing, and that he conveyed the historical style of a given work. The sense for the style of different eras and composers is hard to assess, since style is subjective and constantly changing. It is unlikely what Joachim considered an era’s style, and what Hohenemser perceived and remembered, is the same as what we would recognize as a historically-informed performance. That notwithstanding, others also remarked on Joachim’s pioneering approach to works from different eras. It would be interesting to read Hohenemser’s dissertation, “Welche Einflüsse hatte die Wieder-Belebung der älteren Musik im 19. Jahrhundert auf die deutschen Komponisten?” in this context.

“But perhaps the most remarkable thing about it was how he based each movement on a particular timbre. In some Haydn quartet adagios, the tone shone with a sensuous beauty; in some Beethoven passages, it was stifled, spiritualized, almost shadowy; in contrast, the Adagio of the Violin Concerto or the solo to the “Benedictus” of the “Missa Solemnis” sounded like heavenly transfiguration, like blissful peace in eternal light. Of course, the change of tone colors within the individual movements was also astonishing. Thus, the attentive listener would remember how, in the variation movement (on Death and the Maiden) of Schubert’s D minor quartet, the timbre brightened each time at the transition to major. The change of tone colors, which animated Joachim’s entire playing, is the single instance of his art in which no one has imitated him to this day. That he was not one of those who emphasize “beautiful passages” is connected with his sense for stylistic unity. Whoever, for example, performs the second theme in the first movement of Beethoven’s Concerto sentimentally is not of the Joachim school; by such a performance, he spoils the indescribably beautiful simplicity of this song and at the same time the stylistic unity of the movement as a whole.”[6]“Aber das Merkwürdigste dabei war vielleicht, wie er jedem Satz eine besondere Klangfarbe zugrunde legte. In manchem Haydnschen Quartettadagio erstrahlte der Ton in sinnlicher Schönheit, in … Continue reading

Joachim’s ability to use changing timbres and colors for expressive purposes is extraordinary in Hohenemser’s description. I don’t think I have come across other accounts of this quality. His example of the second theme from the Beethoven Concerto helps clarify what he meant by a sense for the style of a work.

“Furthermore, Joachim’s playing was distinguished by strict adherence to the meter while maintaining small deviations, i.e. by the use of tempo rubato in the Mozartian sense (“Your left must not know what your right is doing”), and further by strong emphasis on all important accents. This whole treatment of rhythm gave his performance firmness and at the same time elasticity and freedom, while the exaggerated use of the actual tempo rubato, i.e. the change in the meter, leads to distortion, and the lack of sharp accentuation to blurring, of which one can be persuaded again and again also among celebrated artists.”[7]“Weiter zeichnete sich Joachims Spiel durch strenges Festhalten des Zeitmaßes bei fortwährenden kleinen Abweichungen aus, also durch Anwendung des Tempo rubato im Mozartschen Sinn (»Deine … Continue reading

“The wealth of bowing techniques at Joachim’s disposal was almost incomprehensible, enabling him to create the finest shadings. His bowing technique was even more astonishing than the technique of his left hand, in which many others are not inferior to him. But it is precisely the perfection of his playing that proves the tremendous importance of bow technique.”[8]“Geradezu unbegreiflich war die Fülle der Stricharten, die Joachim zu Gebote standen und ihm die feinsten Schattierungen ermöglichten. Seine Bogentechnik war noch erstaunlicher als die … Continue reading

Compare to this description of Joachim’s expressive approach to rhythm by John Fuller Maitland: “‘Elasticity’ is the word which best expresses the effect of his delivery of some characteristic themes; as in a perfect rubato there is a feeling of resilience, of rebound, in the sequence of the notes, a constant and perfect restoration of balance between pressure and resistance taking place, as an indiarubber ball resumes its original shape after being pressed.”[9]John Fuller Maitland, Joseph Joachim (London and New York: John Lane, 1905), 28-9.
His bowing was the most controversial aspect of his technique, so Hohenemser’s fervent endorsement is unusual. See, for instance, this article from 1901 on “The Joachim Bowing” in The Etude, which sparked replies, rebuttals, and further discussion for years.

“It was fortunate that in Joachim the artist and the teacher were united. The promotion of real talent had always been a matter of the heart for him. Thus, already in Hanover, he had quite a number of pupils, among them Leopold Auer and Richard Barth. Of course, he never dealt with beginners and was not able to give a precise account of the nature of his technique, which he had already acquired as a child. But born pedagogues, such as Moser (who together with Joachim tried to set down his particular ways in a major violin school) and other of his students, witnessed his bowing and bowing technique above all and passed it on. For advanced students he must have been an ideal teacher, since with his amazing memory he never lacked examples, whose execution was always first rate.”[10]“Es war ein Glück, daß sich in Joachim der Künstler und der Lehrer vereinigten. Von jeher war ihm die Forderung wirklicher Talente Herzenssache. So hatte er schon in Hannover eine ganze … Continue reading

“The foundation of the National [sic] School of Music in Berlin in 1869 proves how his own public appearances did not suffice for him, and how much he was concerned with the lasting welfare of musical art as a whole. His main activity as a teacher dates from this time onwards. To give an idea of this, one only needs to mention some of his famous students, such as Henri Petri, Markees, Willi Hess, Huberman, Karl Klingler, Vecsey, Marie Soldat-Röger, Gabriele Wietrowetz. But the importance of this effectiveness is only fully grasped when one considers that hundreds of teachers are striving to pass on what they have absorbed from Joachim to the younger generations of violin-playing musicians and dilettantes.”[11]“Wie wenig ihm sein eigenes öffentliches Auftreten genügte, wie sehr es ihm vielmehr um das dauernde Wohl der gesamten Tonkunst zu tun war, beweist die Gründung der staatlichen Hochschule … Continue reading

It is always interesting to see who is named in a list of Joachim’s famous students, as it varies depending on time and place, and tends to include names of violinists who did not in fact study with Joachim. Bronislaw Huberman and Franz von Vecsey, who were child prodigies when they played for Joachim, did not study at the Hochschule. Markees, Hess, Klingler, and Wietrowetz graduated from the student body to be longterm members of the Hochschule’s staff. Joachim was the main teacher of Henri Petri and Marie Soldat-Röger, who were among his students who had the longest careers both as soloists and quartet leaders.

“Joachim owes his comprehensive musical education, which is necessary to successfully lead a versatile institution such as a conservatory, to his disposition and his character, but also to his course of development, which seems to us to be determined by a unique destiny. Taught in his early youth by the best teacher to be found in Pest, the boy came to Vienna at the age of eight to Josef Böhm, the excellent violin teacher who had already trained H. W. Ernst and under Beethoven’s own supervision participated in his last quartets. He cultivated quartet playing in his house, so that the young Joachim was introduced to the classical tradition. At the age of twelve, he moved to Leipzig, where Mendelssohn took care of him in the most fatherly way, supervised his violin studies, which he now pursued without a teacher, recommended Hauptmann to him as a teacher in the theoretical subjects, reviewed his compositions and took care of his general education. During his time as concertmaster in Weimar, 1850-53, his close contact with Liszt challenged him. At the same time, however, he also became acquainted with Liszt’s approach to composition up close, so that he was later able to reject it out of the deepest conviction, which he achieved not without struggle. Approximately from the time of the move to Hanover the personal contact with Liszt was followed by the friendship with Clara and Robert Schumann and the witnessing of the tragic fate that befell the latter. It is clear how this had to deepen and mature the inner man. The beginning of his friendship with Brahms, with whom he had the most fruitful relationship in musical matters in the years to come, occurred at the same time.”[12]“Die umfassende musikalische Durchbildung, die erfordert wird, um eine so vielseitige Anstalt, wie es eine Musikhochschule ist, mit Erfolg leiten zu können, verdankt Joachim seiner Veranlagung … Continue reading

“Joachim’s development seems to have suffered a break in one aspect only, namely in his compositional activity. For more than one reason, his works should be thoroughly examined with regard to their artistic value and their historical position. But whatever the result of this investigation may be, it is certain that Joachim’s importance for posterity lies first and foremost in his subsequent work and his teaching activities, and that every generation of musicians in which his spirit is still alive is on the right path.”[13]“Nur in einem Punkt scheint Joachims Entwicklung einen Bruch erlitten zu haben, nämlich in seiner kompositorischen Tätigkeit. Aus mehr als einem Grunde sollten seine Werke auf ihren … Continue reading

Hohenemser’s call for a through study of Joachim’s compositions was finally answered in 2018, with Katharina Uhde’s The Music of Joseph Joachim (Boydell Press).


A note about the author

I wanted to find out about the author Richard Hohensemer, who seemed to be writing from a violinist’s perspective, and whose name I had seen among the authors in the first years of Die Musik. A bit of digging uncovered an astonishing story with a terrible end. Although this Jewish musicologist (1870-1942) was blind from birth, he studied at Berlin University and completed his doctorate in Munich in 1899. His writings in Die Musik focused on Schumann and Beethoven; his other writings demonstrated an expertise in philosophy and music aesthetics.[14]The German Wikipedia article has links to some of these essays. He married the daughter of an English minister, and their son Kurt became a famous aerodynamics engineer. Because his wife was not Jewish, he was not persecuted, and they stayed in Berlin after 1933. But in 1942, Richard and Alice Hohenemser took their lives when they feared they were going to be deported.[15]Egon Schwarz, “Kurt Hohenemser,” Begegnungen. Der literarische Zaunkönig Nr. 2/2013, pp. 42-6, www.erika-mitterer.org. Just recently (16 June 2021) Stolpersteine were laid down to mark their home at Havensteinstraße 26, Lankwitz, Berlin.

Source: Wikipedia.de
"An assessment of Joachim’s importance from 1931." MUSIC IN BERLIN, 1870-1910 - Accessed August 8, 2022. https://sannapederson.oucreate.com/blog/archives/9349
MUSIC IN BERLIN, 1870-1910 (August 8, 2022) An assessment of Joachim’s importance from 1931. Retrieved from https://sannapederson.oucreate.com/blog/archives/9349.
"An assessment of Joachim’s importance from 1931." MUSIC IN BERLIN, 1870-1910 - August 8, 2022, https://sannapederson.oucreate.com/blog/archives/9349
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

References

References
1 See Amos Elon,The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933 (Metropolitan Books, 2002).
2 Beatrix Borchard, Stimme und Geige. Amalie und Joseph Joachim (Böhlau, 2005):15-18.
3 “Am 28. Juni begeht die musikalische Welt die hundertste Wiederkehr des Geburtstages Joseph Joachims. Da drängt sich die Frage auf, ob er, der 60 Jahre hindurch nicht nur Tausenden Augenblicke höchster Beglückung und Erhebung gespendet, sondern auch sehr viele für ihr ganzes musikalisches Leben gleichsam geheiligt hat, noch für die Gegenwart und Zukunft Bedeutung besitzt und besitzen soll.”
4 “Geschichtlich feststehend und unbedingt bleibend ist die Wirkung, die er auf die Stellung gewisser Werke im Konzertsaal ausgeübt hat. Erst durch ihn ist der Welt die unvergleichliche Schönheit des Beethovenschen Violinkonzertes enthüllt worden, dessen sich vorher nur einzelne Geiger ganz gelegentlich angenommen hatten. Heute zählt jeder wahre Geigenkünstler zu einer seiner höchsten Aufgaben, diesem Konzert  gerecht  zu  werden.  Joachim war der erste, der es wagte, die sechs Sonaten und Partiten von Bach, die bereits Ferdinand David neu herausgegeben hatte, ohne Begleitung vorzutragen, also so, wie sie von ihrem Schöpfer gedacht sind. Auch mit diesen Werken riß er stets und überall seine Hörer hin und machte dadurch ihr Studium und damit das Studium des unbegleiteten polyphonen Geigenspiels geradezu obligatorisch. Die letzten Quartette Beethovens verdanken hauptsächlich ihm die Stellung, die sie heute in unseren Kammermusikaufführungen einnehmen. Daß überhaupt das Streichquartett im Konzertleben der Gegenwart einen so breiten Raum zu beanspruchen vermag, muß auf die Tätigkeit und die Erfolge des Quartettspielers Joachim zurückgeführt werden. Nicht weniger wichtig als seine Pionierarbeit für Bach und Beethoven, übrigens auch für Schubert, ist sein Eintreten für zeitgenössische Kompositionen, vor allem für die Kammermusikwerke von Schumann und Brahms und für das Brahmssche Violinkonzert.”
5 “Die dauernden Wirkungen, die Joachims Spiel unmittelbar erzeugte, lassen sich natürlicherweise nicht feststellen; aber ich glaube, man kann sie kaum überschätzen. Sein Vortrag war von so überzeugender Kraft, daß er in jedem Ausübenden die Sehnsucht erwecken mußte, ihm wenigstens so nahe wie möglich zu kommen. Nun läßt sich freilich das Individuellste des Vortrags, das rein Persönliche, nicht nachahmen. Die musikalische Reproduktion ist ja ein Nachschaffen, oder soll es doch sein, also jedesmal ein neues Erleben des Kunstwerks; dabei kann demnach die Persönlichkeit des Erlebenden nicht ausgeschaltet werden. Darum hat auch Joachim seinen Vortrag niemals bis ins kleinste festgelegt, sondern, wie sein Biograph Andreas Moser gezeigt hat, der augenblicklichen Eingebung Spielraum gelassen. Er durfte es, weil er die allgemeingültigen Eigenschaften des Künstlers, d. h. diejenigen, über die jeder Künstler verfügen sollte, im höchsten Maß besaß; und darum wirkte sein Spiel so erziehend, ohne daß er doch jemals irgendwelche pädagogische Absicht an den Tag legte. Vor allem hatte er den unbedingten Willen und die unbedingte Fähigkeit, jedes Werk gemäß dem ihm eigentümlichen Stil wiederzugeben. Das erstreckte sich von der Grundhaltung bis auf alle Einzelheiten.
6 “Aber das Merkwürdigste dabei war vielleicht, wie er jedem Satz eine besondere Klangfarbe zugrunde legte. In manchem Haydnschen Quartettadagio erstrahlte der Ton in sinnlicher Schönheit, in manchem Beethovenschen war er entsinnlicht, vergeistigt, fast schattenhaft; dagegen klang es aus dem Adagio des Violin­ konzerts oder dem Solo zum »Benedictus« der »Missa Solemnis« wie himmlische Verklärtheit, wie selige Ruhe in ewigem Licht. Selbstverständlich war auch innerhalb des einzelnen Satzes der Wechsel der Klangfarben zu bewundern. So wird es dem aufmerksamen Hörer im Gedächtnis geblieben sein, wie sich im Variationensatz (der Tod und das Mädchen) des Schubertschen d-moll-Quartetts jedesmal beim Übergang nach Dur die Klangfarbe aufhellte. Der Wechsel der Klangfarben, der Joachims ganzes Spiel belebte, ist dasjenige Einzelmoment seiner Kunst, in dem es ihm bis heute keiner nachgetan hat. Mit seinem Sinn für Einheit des Stils hangt es zusammen, daß er nicht zu denjenigen gehörte, die »schöne Stellen« herausheben. Wer z. B. das zweite Thema im ersten Satz des Beethovenschen Konzertes sentimental vorträgt, ist nicht von der Joachimschen Schule; er verdirbt durch einen solchen Vortrag die unbeschreiblich schöne Einfachheit dieses Gesanges und zugleich die Stileinheit des ganzen Satzes.”
7 “Weiter zeichnete sich Joachims Spiel durch strenges Festhalten des Zeitmaßes bei fortwährenden kleinen Abweichungen aus, also durch Anwendung des Tempo rubato im Mozartschen Sinn (»Deine Linke darf nicht wissen, was deine Rechte tut«), und ferner durch scharfes Hervorheben aller sinngemäßen Akzente. Diese ganze Behandlung des Rhythmus verlieh seinem Vortrag Festigkeit und zugleich Elastizität und Freiheit, während die übertriebene Verwendung des eigentlichen Tempo rubato, also des Wechsels im Zeitmaß, zur Verzerrtheit, und der Mangel an scharfer Akzentuierung zur Verschwommenheit führt, wovon man sich auch bei gefeierten Künstlern immer wieder überzeugen kann.”
8 “Geradezu unbegreiflich war die Fülle der Stricharten, die Joachim zu Gebote standen und ihm die feinsten Schattierungen ermöglichten. Seine Bogentechnik war noch erstaunlicher als die Technik seiner linken Hand, in der manch anderer nicht gegen ihn zurücksteht. Aber gerade die Vollendung seines Spiels beweist die ungeheurere Wichtigkeit der Bogentechnik.”
9 John Fuller Maitland, Joseph Joachim (London and New York: John Lane, 1905), 28-9.
10 “Es war ein Glück, daß sich in Joachim der Künstler und der Lehrer vereinigten. Von jeher war ihm die Forderung wirklicher Talente Herzenssache. So hatte er schon in Hannover eine ganze Reihe von Schülern, darunter Leopold Auer und Richard Barth. Natürlich beschäftigte er sich niemals mit Anfängern und vermochte auch nicht, sich über das Wesen seiner Technik, die er ja schon als Kind erworben  hatte, genaue Rechenschaft  abzulegen. Aber geborene Pädagogen, wie Moser (der zusammen mit Joachim dessen Eigenart in einer grosen Violinschule zu fixieren suchte) und andere seiner Schüler, sahen ihm vor allem seine Bogenführung und Bogentechnik ab und gaben sie weiter. Für Vorgeschrittene muß er ein  idealer  Lehrer gewesen sein, da es ihm bei seinem erstaunlichen Gedächtnis niemals an Beispielen fehlte, deren Ausführung stets auf der Hohe stand.
11 “Wie wenig ihm sein eigenes öffentliches Auftreten genügte, wie sehr es ihm vielmehr um das dauernde Wohl der gesamten Tonkunst zu tun war, beweist die Gründung der staatlichen Hochschule für Musik in Berlin 1869. Von dieser Zeit an datiert seine Hauptwirksamkeit als Lehrer. Um von dieser einen Begriff zu geben, braucht man nur einige seiner berühmt gewordenen Schüler zu nennen, wie Henri Petri, Markees, Willi Hess, Huberman, Karl Klingler, Vecsey, Marie Soldat-Röger, Gabriele Wietrowetz. Aber ganz hat man die Bedeutung dieser Wirksamkeit erst erfaßt, wenn man bedenkt, daß Hunderte von Lehrern bemüht sind, das, was sie bei Joachim in sich auf genommen haben, den jüngeren Generationen der geigenden Musiker und Dilettanten zu übermitteln.”
12 “Die umfassende musikalische Durchbildung, die erfordert wird, um eine so vielseitige Anstalt, wie es eine Musikhochschule ist, mit Erfolg leiten zu können, verdankt Joachim seiner Veranlagung und seinem Charakter, zugleich aber auch seinem Entwicklungsgang, der uns wie von einem gültigen Geschick bestimmt erscheint. Schon in früher Jugend von dem besten Lehrer unterrichtet, der in Pest zu finden war, kam der Knabe mit acht Jahren nach Wien zu dem ausgezeichneten Violinpädagogen Josef  Böhm, der bereits H. W. Ernst ausgebildet und noch unter den Augen Beethovens in dessen letzten Quartetten mitgewirkt hatte. In seinem Hause pflegte er das Quartettspiel, so daß der junge Joachim die klassische Tradition noch kennenlernte. Zwölfjährig siedelte er nach Leipzig über, wo sich Mendelssohn in der väterlichsten Weise seiner annahm, seine Violinstudien, die er von jetzt an ohne Lehrer betrieb, selbst überwachte, ihm Hauptmann als Lehrer in den theoretischen Fachen empfahl, seine Kompositionen durchsah und für seine allgemeine Bildung sorgte. Während seiner Konzertmeisterzeit in Weimar, 1850-53, forderte ihn der nahe Verkehr mit Liszt. Zugleich aber lernte er auch dessen Richtung in der Komposition aus der Nähe kennen, so daß er sie später aus tiefster, nicht ohne Kampf errungener Überzeugung ablehnen konnte. Auf den persönlichen Verkehr mit Liszt folgte, etwa seit der Übersiedlung nach Hannover, die Freundschaft mit Clara und Robert Schumann und das Miterleben des tragischen Schicksals, das über letzteren hereinbrach. Es ist klar, wie dies den inneren Menschen vertiefen und reifen mußte. In die gleiche Zeit fällt der Beginn der Freundschaft mit Brahms, zu dem er in den nächsten Jahren in musikalischen Dingen im fruchtbarsten Verhältnis gegenseitigen Nehmens und Gebens stand.”
13 “Nur in einem Punkt scheint Joachims Entwicklung einen Bruch erlitten zu haben, nämlich in seiner kompositorischen Tätigkeit. Aus mehr als einem Grunde sollten seine Werke auf ihren künstlerischen Wert und ihre geschichtliche Stellung hin einmal gründlich untersucht werden. Aber welches Ergebnis diese Untersuchung auch haben möge, sicher ist, daß Joachims Bedeutung für die Nachwelt in allererster Linie gerade in seinem Nachschaffen und seiner Lehrtätigkeit liegt, und daß sich jede Musikergeneration, in der sein Geist noch lebendig ist, auf dem rechten Wege befindet.”
14 The German Wikipedia article has links to some of these essays.
15 Egon Schwarz, “Kurt Hohenemser,” Begegnungen. Der literarische Zaunkönig Nr. 2/2013, pp. 42-6, www.erika-mitterer.org.

One thought on “An assessment of Joachim’s importance from 1931

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

css.php