Category: Joseph Joachim

An assessment of Joachim’s importance from 1931

The centennial of Joachim’s birth in 1931 was observed in Berlin and elsewhere with tributes recalling the important part he had played in so many aspects of musical life. Only a few years later the Nazi re-writing of Germany history began, in which Jewish artists and intellectuals were purged from the German culture they helped […]

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Loving Spohr

Yesterday I came upon a review that sheds light on the popularity of Ludwig Spohr’s violin music, which was the question I was left with after researching the repertoire of violin soloists at the Leipzig Gewandhaus over the nineteenth century. The reception history of Spohr isn’t a topic simply to google or look up on […]

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The Joachim tradition at the Gewandhaus

Joachim and the Gewandhaus: a sixty-year symbiosis Among the lore of this historic institution is Joachim’s debut as a twelve-year-old at the Gewandhaus in 1843. (Robert Eshbach has documented this event on his website). The Gewandhaus’s conductor Felix Mendelssohn and concertmaster Ferdinand David oversaw Joachim’s development as the child prodigy went through his teenage years. […]

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Happy Birthday to Joachim’s students

March 23rd is not only the birthday of Johann Kruse, but also of Ernst Schiever and Hugo Olk. March has seemed to me to be a popular month for this cohort, and a quick analysis of the birth dates I have indicates that, indeed, more of these students were born in March than in any […]

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Joachim’s student Johann Kruse, Part 2: Nellie Melba

“Do you hear anything of Kruse? He never writes, and I long to know something about him.”–11 June 1900 In Joachim’s letters to his London brother Henry and his wife Ellen, Johann Kruse comes up over twenty times, far more than any other former student. (These letters are transcribed and available online on the Brahms […]

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Profiles of Joachim’s Students: 4. Johann Kruse

Johann Kruse (1859-1927) was one of Joachim’s more important students: he taught at the Hochschule and was a member of the Joachim Quartet for five years. My preparation for writing up a short profile has stretched out into months, and this post has grown tentacles that need to be hacked off. These are the role […]

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The stiff-upper-lip school of music

F. S. Kelly (1881-1916), pianist and composer Frederick Septimus Kelly is remembered today as one of the “lost” generation killed in World War I – specifically as part of the Hood Battalion of the Royal Navy, where so many of Britain’s young elite of talent and birth served as officers before being killed. But he […]

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